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Tuesday, January 08, 2008

BE WARNED

THANKS TO MY FRIEND NANCY. THIS ARTICLE APPEARED TODAY IN THE FAYETTEVILLE OBSERVER. AFTER YOU READ THIS READ THE LAME EXCUSES FOR MILITARY TECHNOLOGY ABOARD COMMERCIAL FLIGHTS BELOW. THAT ARTICLE CAME FROM HOMELAND INSECURITY. THIS COULD HAPPEN TO YOU!!!!


Leonard Pitts, Jr., is a syndicated columnist. The following article not printed in full but with the meaning was in the Fayetteville Observer today. Please take heed when victims of Non-lethal weapons abuse write about their atrocity because this article is about the same thing. World War II, MKultra, co-intelpro and non-lethal weapons to carry it out. Please find the following article: THE WORST CAN HAPPEN HERE by Leonard Pitts, Jr.

The authorities would just come into your home, grab your mother, your brother, your dad, and take them away. No warning, no warrant, no appeal.
Thirty thousand people disappeared that way, she told me. This was in an interview three years ago, and Ruth Cox was describing her childhood in Argentina under military dictatorship. Cox, a teacher in Charleston, S.C., said families never learned what happened to their loved ones. The government was not accountable.

My first response was a pride that those things can't happen here.

My second response was to realize that my first response was naive. These last years have provided a jolting education in the sorts of things that can, indeed, happen here. Mass surveillance, detention without access to courts, no right to confront, or even know, the evidence against you, torture. And a government that is not accountable.

So last week's news that the Justice Department has launched a criminal investigation into the CIA's destruction of videotapes said to depict the harsh interrogration of terrorism suspects is welcome, but also belated.

There is nothing new about being scared. Nor about abridging civil liberties in response. It happened in the civil rights movement, in the Red scare, happened when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, when the nation plunged into World War I.

But it's worth noting that only one major abridgement of civil liberties in time of national emergency- Lincoln's suspension of habeas corpus during the Civil War- stands justified by hindsight. The rest, we regard with a shamefaced fascination.

And me, I also wonder this: Are we doomed to keep learning the same lesson every generation? Or will we finally decide someday to stand for what we stand for even when we are scared? That kind of courage might not stop terrorists, but it could cripple "terrorism."

Because violence that intends to instill fear is not the only threat we face. We are also threatened by the fear itself.

It can't happen here, I said. But of course, it already has.